It would be a wise idea to maintain good oral health as according to a new findings by doctors, the kind of bacteria, which is commonly seen in the mouth has been found in the brains of people who have had a stroke.

Researchers from Tampere University in Finland, the group behind the new findings has been studying a possible association between bacterial infections and cardiovascular disease for more than a decade. Their study looked for signs of bacteria in blood cots removed from 75 patients who were treated for an ischemic stroke at Tampere University Hospital in Finland between 2013 and 2017.

The study found that  levels of the oral bacteria were much higher in the blood clot samples than they were in other samples that surgeons took from the same patients.

The bacteria involved, called viridans streptococci, are believed to cause endocarditis, an infection of the lining, valves or muscles of the heart

The new study is “the first to show common presence of (this) bacterial DNA in ischemic patients,” said Olli Patrakka, the study’s lead author.

A stroke is a “brain attack”. It occurs when the brain suddenly experiences a disruption to its blood supply. The most common type of stroke is ischemic stroke, which occurs due to a blockage in a blood vessel in the brain. It accounts for about 87% of all strokes.

“Our results suggest that bacteria might have a role in the development of serious complications related to atherosclerosis,” a condition in which plaques form in the walls of arteries and cause them to narrow and harden over time. The plaques are deposits of cellular waste, fat, cholesterol, and other materials.

In regard to the recent findings, streptococci are harmless in the case of oral cavity, but when entering circulation, they might cause, among other things, infections of the cardiac valves. The streptococcus bacteria can directly bind to various platelet receptors,making the patient more prone to blood cot.

The research shows that oral health and good dental hygiene are of much greater importance to health than previously known, and that untreated dental infections can cause serious health damage or even death.